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dollar funded battery marker a-123 systems is up for sale. the winning bid goes to -- china. so i asked was red china rising why u.s. taxpayers have to finance their battery companies. here's ann lee, author of "what the u.s. can learn from china," professor of nyu and visiting professor from beijing university and author kwof "death by china" and cnbc contributor. ann, let me go to you first. if we, the u.s. taxpayer and government are dumb enough to build a goofy battery company that goes bankrupt why shouldn't china scoop it up? >> i think this is a great story. first of all, taxpayer money wasn't wasted. all that money from the government went to help property plant and equipment here on american soil. and it's staying in america. chinese companies are not going to pack it up and move it to china. it's staying in the united states. they are going to hire u.s. employees to run it. that means more american prosperity. that's what we want. i think this is a win-win situation. the company that bought this is basically like the warren buffett of china. >> all right. let me get there. the
line of mac computers in china, apple is set to bring some of its manufacturing jobs back home to the usa. is this a political move or is this a clear-cut economic manufacturing move? here to discuss is "forbes" columnist and china export gordon chang, the author of "the coming collapse of china." serious question, do you think actual's doing this for politics or economics? >> actually both. but when you look at china, though, their manufacturing days are over. americans are less produmore pr less prone to strike -- >> are you sure american works are less prone to strike? we've reported on this show a whole bunch of strikes, including the hostess twinkie companies, the ports of los angeles and out on the west coast. we have obama in the white house. the unions are going whild here. in all seriousness, i don't think unions are any more placid here than they are in china. >> but in china, workers go out on wildcat strikes all the time. foxconn which manufactures about 97% of apple's products, they've been really subject to labor troubles, from suicides to strikes. so i think appl
. they're probably going to succeed. some people are saying that china is also reinflating and they had a soft landing. then what about europe? i've seen some people touting europe. if you look at the financial fear indicators in europe, that crisis is basically over. >> well, yes, it is. i don't know if you can capture in the frame on the camera. what i'm doing here, i'm patting myself on the back. who is it who's been telling your viewers for two years every time there's one of these trumped-up crises in europe to buy it. now there's been a solution. europe has been stabilized. it's actually the brightest place for investors on the planet. i'm sorry you missed the bottom but it's not too late. you look at after hearing that segment on the u.s. government making the decision to debase paper coins by turning them into -- paper money by turning them into junk disposable paper coins? well what would you rather own? the ten-year american bond, treasury bond yielding what, 1.6%? or would you rather have a spanish bond denominated in the strongest currency in the world, the euro, paying 5.5%
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3